briana snyder photography » wedding and portrait photography in dayton, ohio and beyond

film: 3d disposable camera

At a thrift store last week, I came across this guy. He was .79, had expired in 1999, and the battery for his flash was way dead, but brand new. I was pretty ridiculously excited–I mean, 3d photos! .79!

Pin It

The camera takes three shots with each of the three little lenses (which is why it only takes 16 images per roll–it is really 3 of each). I had it processed at a local lab before I even realized that there were special labs that would process and make lenticular prints from these 3d cameras. Not that it would have mattered–the lab I found online can’t do them anymore, anyway. But, you can animate them yourself (thanks, technology!). Only a few of my shots from this way-expired camera turned out, but I was able to animate one of my friend Alicia (at the 2nd Street Market here in Dayton). The three individual shots:

Pin It

And, animated:

Pin It

There are some really cool ones on Flickr, too. Supposedly there are a couple of these cameras for sale on Amazon, but who knows–they must be super old. Anyway, I just love playing around with different kinds of goofy cameras. Happy Wednesday!

talk to me/subscribe
  • Hello, I have two of these cameras NEW in their original box, and sealed silvered plastic envelope.
    Inside the box, there are instructions to send to a LAB which unfortunately no longer exists, to get 3d lenticular PRINTS.
    I have some of those prints from an older camera roll, but I wonder if I could find a new lab that could make those prints.
    Do you have any idea?
    ErnestoReplyCancel

    • Hi Ernesto! Actually, you should be able to take the film to any lab to have it developed, then you’ll just have to get the film scanned and play around with the digital files. They will be three different “frames” per shot, so you might need to find somewhere that can play around with the scanning a bit. I’d recommend stacking them into a GIF, like I did, but you also could just layer them in Photoshop then get prints made from the final images. I used a local lab called MotoPhoto–if you’re willing to mail it out, they probably remember doing them for me and could help you out. Good luck! :)ReplyCancel

Your email is never published or shared. Required fields are marked *

*

*